RAID Data Recovery

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To Start the Data Recovery process, please fill out the form below.

The Data Rescue Center's RAID and Server data recovery service is professional, courteous, affordable, and secure.

Our Technicians specialize in both RAID Data Recovery and Server Data Recovery. We can recover RAIDs and Servers with any type of configuration including Virtual Servers and Network RAIDs.

Raid Data Recovery

When faced with a data loss situation, the best practice would be to contact us immediately so we can assist you and take the correct steps to ensure the best possible results to recover your data. To ensure no further damage is done, please disconnect the device from power and fill out the form above to begin the data recovery process.

Supported Manufacturers

  • Microsoft
  • Linux
  • SUN Solaris
  • Apple
  • Novell
  • Compaq
  • HP
  • Dell
  • Lacie
  • OWC
  • G-Tech
  • DROBO
  • Synology
  • SansDigital
  • Terramaster
  • And More

Supported File Systems

  • HFS(+) (Mac)
  • NTFS (Windows)
  • FAT 12,16,32
  • Reiser (Linux)
  • ZFS (Linux)
  • XFS (NAS)
  • Free/Open/Net BSD
  • Proprietary (ex: Drobo)
  • And More

Not seeing your RAID/Server or File system listed? We recover data from all file systems and RAID/Server manufacturers. For more information call our customer support line at 1-877-501-4949.

In Emergency situations we offer Rush and Emergency Diagnosis options for an additional fee. The Rush Diagnosis will be performed same day as the day we receive the drive(s), while the Emergency Diagnosis will be within two hours of our technicians receiving the drive(s).

Raid Data Recovery

The Data Rescue Center is capable of dealing with all kinds of multi-disk setups, from just a bunch of disks (JBOD) to every RAID configuration from RAID 0 to RAID 6 and proprietary RAID systems like DROBOs as well. Whatever your needs, be sure to contact our RAID and server experts for more information.

Open RAID

RAID data recovery cases always require all the drives that are involved in the setup, even if the problem was only caused by one failed drive. Sending in all drives provides the best chance for successful recovery.

You will need a RAID data recovery if any physical damage to the drive(s) occurred. The RAID needs to be repaired first before the structure can be recreated in the lab. Once the RAID has been reconstructed all of the data can be extracted to a healthy drive.

Server Data Recovery

Even with a disaster recovery plan in place, there is always the possibility of a potential data loss situation. It be a multiple drive failure, a power surge hitting the server or potentially some sort of uncontrollable external force that brings down your server. No matter the situation, The Data Rescue Center has the trained staff and top-of-the-line equipment to get your server and business up and running as soon as possible.

Server Data Recovery

The Data Rescue Center has performed hundreds of server data recoveries over the years, recovering from both logical and physical server failures including virtual server recoveries.

Some servers utilize RAID technologies to add data redundancy, speed and space. This type of storage can complicate the server data recovery process, if this component of the system is the root cause of the failure.

What Is A RAID?

RAID 0 – Data Recovery

RAID 0 is a very popular RAID data recovery option these days due to their high performance and capacity benefits. They can be configured with two or more hard disks using either a Hardware RAID Card or Software RAID solution. These aspects make them a very enticing setup for Manufactures looking to provide their clients with a High Performance and High Capacity product at a relatively low cost.

The main downside to the RAID 0 configuration is its lack of redundancy, also referred to as “fault tolerance”. If one drive in the RAID 0 Array fails, all of the data on the array can be lost.

The RAID recovery engineers at The Data Rescue Center have developed safe and reliable methods to recover data from failed RAID Arrays. Their years of experience in reconstructing RAID arrays gives The Data Rescue Center a very high RAID recovery rate and puts your sensitive data in capable hands.

A Single Disk Failure can Take Down the Entire Array.

The absence of any fault tolerance mechanism makes data loss a serious situation in a RAID 0 setup. RAID 0 is a popular option for those who crave the ultimate in performance. They can be configured to work with any number of hard disks and are used in applications where I/O bandwidth is the critical factor. However, RAID 0 does not involve the use of redundancy, which means that the risk of data loss is perhaps the highest of any RAID level. A single disk failure can take down the entire array.

We have specialized tools and techniques that allow us to excel in RAID 0 data recovery. Our data recovery experts work tirelessly to recover your critical data. We treat server and RAID recovery jobs as high priority cases. We realize the importance that these platforms tend to have, and many businesses depend on their servers as they are an integral part of their operation.

Our RAID data recovery services have been developed through many years of experience, innovative methods, and the high standards to which our clients have become accustomed.

In RAID 0, data is stored in stripes for maximum efficiency. The data is broken into fragments and distributed throughout the entire array. The number of fragments depends on the number of disks in the array, and the fragments are then written to each disk in the array at the same time. Having the data broken into fragments greatly improves read and write performance – whereas regular (single) hard disks require all of the data to be written sequentially, RAID 0 allows for different parts of the data to be written to the separate disks simultaneously.

RAID 0 Has no Fault Tolerance

RAID 0 does not implement error checking or correcting features. In other words, RAID 0 has no fault tolerance. For this reason, RAID 0 is chosen where performance is a higher priority than data integrity. High-end gaming platforms, for example, often feature RAID 0 storage.

Identical drives are recommended for any RAID 0 setup. If drive capacities differ, the total capacity of the RAID 0 array will be determined by the smallest drive in the array.

Contact our RAID recovery team with any questions you have.

RAID 1 – Data Recovery

The RAID 1 configuration is a highly redundant system that is ideal for Data Archiving. This type of RAID setup requires two or more hard disks that are exact duplicates of each other, the term used in the RAID world is “mirroring.” The “mirroring” of the array members provides system redundancy, which allows one or more hard disks to fail while maintaining the system operation.

The RAID 1 configuration is a very secure method of storing your data, but even the most secure setup is susceptible to a hard drive failure. Since failure can still occur The Data Rescue Center has developed safe and reliable methods to perform a secure RAID data recovery from failed RAID 1 arrays.

Substantial Protection

RAID 1 provides a relatively high degree of fault tolerance at a low cost. This is ideal for applications where storage efficiency and performance are not critical. By mirroring all of the data on a second drive, RAID 1 provides substantial protection against the failure of either disk in the array. However, no RAID setup is immune to data loss, and even the best systems can still fail due to power surges, controller faults, and other causes.

In a RAID 1 configuration, a full copy of the data residing on one disk is maintained in another disk in real-time. The setup is occasionally extended to three or more disks to provide for additional protection. A RAID 1 setup can continue to operate even if all but one of the disks fail.

Write Speed in a RAID 1 Setup can be Slower

There may be a small increase in read performance because different parts of the requested data can be read simultaneously from the mirrored drives. However, not all RAID manufacturers implement this, and there are some additional complications involved that decrease the advantage.

Contact our RAID recovery team with any questions you have.

RAID 5 – Data Recovery

Due to the nature of the RAID 5 algorithm and its ability to “rebuild” itself with a single drive failure, the RAID 5 solution has become one of the most popular RAID configurations in use today. When compared to a RAID 0 with an equal number of array members, the RAID 5 is a step down in overall performance and capacity; but the redundancy benefits can be priceless if the data on the array is not properly managed.

The RAID 5 configuration requires three or more hard disks to be assembled using either a Hardware RAID Card or Software RAID solution. The Hardware Card or Software Solution will manage the data being written or read from the array members and create redundancy by using distributed parity.

The Parity Information

The RAID 5 breaks the data into block-level stripes, which are interweaved on the array members with the distributed parity. Should a single drive fail within the array, a member can be regenerated from the parity information. When a drive failure is detected, the RAID system will inform the end-user and continue to operate in a “degraded” mode. At that point, the array has lost its redundancy and will require a rebuilding process to be completed to ensure the data’s safety.

Often, this is where a RAID recovery comes into play. If a second array member fails during the rebuilding process, the RAID array will cease to operate and require professional RAID data recovery services.

Safe and Reliable Methods

The data recovery engineers at The Data Rescue Center have developed safe and reliable methods of recovering data from failed RAID Arrays. Years of experience in reconstructing RAID arrays gives The Data Rescue Center a very high RAID recovery rate and puts your sensitive data in capable hands.

RAID 5 provides excellent fault tolerance with only a marginal cost in performance and efficiency compared to other RAID levels. If one disk fails in a RAID 5 configuration, the rest of the array can continue to operate with no data loss, though performance will degrade severely and the entire array will become vulnerable.

RAID 5 is one of the most versatile RAID configurations. All the various aspects such as performance, efficiency, and fault tolerance are fairly balanced, which makes it an attractive option for a wide variety of purposes.

RAID 5 is commonly used in web servers, file and application servers, e-mail and news servers, database servers, Intranet servers, and home use.

Check and Correct for Errors

RAID 5 is characterized by the block-level striping with distributed parity storage scheme. This means that the actual data on the array is interleaved with parity data to check and correct for errors, and all of this information is distributed across all of the drives in the array in “stripes.”

The parity data allows for a moderate degree of fault tolerance. If one of the disks in a RAID 5 array fails for any reason, the actual data that was stored on it can be deduced from the parity data. However, because parity data is highly compressed, this tends to be very slow.

Therefore, changing a failed disk in a RAID 5 array is necessary — even though it’s possible to continue operating with one failed disk, there will be a severe performance penalty. Furthermore, if one disk fails, the entire array becomes vulnerable to real data loss, and there is usually an increased risk that another disk will fail.

Contact our RAID recovery team with any questions you have.

RAID 10 – Data Recovery

The RAID 10 setup is not commonly used by the average end-user, they are better suited for corporations that require a high redundancy rate as well as moderate performance. These types of RAID arrays are typically found in Enterprise-Level Servers that consist of dozens of hard drives, often these servers are the platform from which major database systems are run.

RAID 10 configurations are considered highly secure due to the redundancy that is created using the nested RAID algorithm. It’s commonly referred to as a “stripe of mirrors”. This RAID style requires a minimum of 4 array members; these array members are split into RAID sets and assembled into RAID 1s. The RAID 1 sets are then assembled into a RAID 0. With this type of redundancy, the array can maintain operation as long as one member from each of the RAID 1 sets is operational.

Should a member of the array fail, the failed member can be regenerated from its counterpart, and this is typically done though an automated process by the RAID system. When a drive failure is detected, the RAID system will inform the end-user and continue to operate in a “degraded” mode.

Data Loss

If the array has lost its redundancy it will require a rebuilding process to be complete to ensure the data’s safety. Often, this is where our clients run into data loss scenarios. If a second array member fails during the rebuilding process, the RAID array will cease to operate and require professional RAID data recovery.

RAID 10 is often used in enterprise servers and database systems. It features a high degree of data protection as well as good performance, efficiency, and fault tolerance is fairly balanced, which makes it an attractive option for a wide variety of purposes.

The RAID 10 Setup

RAID 10 is a “Hybrid” or Nested Raid Configuration. it is Commonly Referred to as a “Stripe of Mirrors”.

A multiple RAID level is created by splitting the disks into sets. Within each set, one RAID configuration is applied, and then across the two sets, another RAID level is applied. Nested RAID configurations are denoted as RAID XY, or equivalently, RAID X+Y, or RAID X/Y. For RAID 10, X is 1 and Y are 0, so each set will have a RAID 1 configuration within it, and RAID 0 will be applied across the two sets.

Four Disks in Each Set

It may be difficult to visualize this, so to illustrate, suppose you own eight disks. The data is divided into “blocks”, and these blocks are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 and so on. We split the disks into two sets so that we will have four disks in each set.

There is a relatively high-efficiency cost to set up a RAID 10 system, but the advantages are enticing: there is a relatively high degree of fault tolerance and good performance. As many as four disks can fail in the setup illustrated above: as long as one disk remains in each set, the data is still intact. The striping also increases read and write performance. These advantages make RAID 10 a good option for high-load enterprise servers and database systems.

Contact our RAID recovery team with any questions you have.

RAID 3, 4, 6, 50 Or Something Unique?

We have recovered data from a wide range of RAID arrays and have accrued a wealth of knowledge that helps us to recover data from the most complex of systems. If you need a data recovery from a unique RAID setup that , give us a call and talk to one of our RAID Data Recovery Engineers, we will have a solution for your situation.

RAID 3, RAID 4, RAID 6, RAID 50, RAID 0+1

RAID configured systems have become fundamental in the vast majority of enterprises across the world. High fault tolerance, as well as the relative cost effectiveness of RAID systems, make them appealing for a wide variety of applications, including storage solutions, high-load servers, and performance workstations.

The talent on our team is unmatched and gives us a powerful edge for performing RAID 3, 4, 50, 0+1 data recovery. Our experts work tirelessly to recover your critical data as quickly and effectively and possible.

Contact our RAID recovery team with any questions you have.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I speak with a technician about my specific setup and situation?

In most situations our trained customer service representatives should be able to answer any questions you may have in regards to our recovery process and how to proceed with the recovery. If you have a more detailed technical question or would like to explain the situation directly to the recovery technicians they can be made available to answer any questions you have.

Do I need to send in all of the drives from the RAID/ Server array?

Yes, all drives that were part of the array and any attempted rebuild drives will need to be sent in to provide the best chance for a successful recovery. To prevent further damage to your RAID array maintain the integrity of the data contained within that RAID, it is important to create clones of each array member and attempt to reconstruct the RAID array using clones. For this reason it is necessary to send in all of the drives from the RAID/Server.

What if only a single drive has failed in the RAID?

In most cases, a RAID splits your data across multiple drives to have redundancy as well as make the data accessible at a faster rate. So in order to perform a successful recovery, we will need to see all the drives from the failed unit as well as the enclosure for the drives as well. Repairing the single failed drive will not allow the data on the RAID volume to be accessed without reconstructing the array.

Will you rebuild my server to how it was before the failure?

Unfortunately due to the many circumstances that can lead to server failure, there is no way to know if we can provide a fully-running rebuilt server. In most server failure cases there is significant damage to the file system leading to unstable performance and repeated errors. In all cases we will try to recover your server in its original state but this is a rare outcome. Typically all of your important data will be extracted to an new healthy drive which you can then transfer and use on a new server.

Do I need to ship the RAID/Server enclosure or can I just send the drives?

Most RAID enclosures will either use a proprietary RAID configuration or an encryption card in the enclosure itself to keep the data secure, however this will require that we also receive the original enclosure so that the data can be read once the drives are repaired.

Can I ship the drives in the enclosure?

When shipping the device you will want to take all the drives out of the enclosure they are in and label and wrap the drives as well as the enclosure separately. This will ensure that the internal SATA connections in the Raid or server are not snapped off during shipment.

For any additional questions please contact us directly at 1-877-501-4949 Monday to Friday (7AM – 10PM PST) or via email.

Why Choose The Data Rescue Center


Data Recovery Lab

The Data Rescue Center offers affordable pricing on all of our RAID and server recoveries. We are confident that our prices are typically 30-40% lower than our competitors. Because of this, we offer an exclusive price match policy. If you find a recovery lab that offers you a lower quote, send it to us and we will match their price.

Whether your RAID or Server has a multi-drive failure, the RAID volume no longer mounts, or your server is no longer booting; our RAID and Server data recovery technicians have the knowledge and capability to recover data from all types of RAID and Server configurations.


Hard Drive Recovery

The Data Rescue Center was founded to help people get their data back under any circumstances.